Saturday, September 03, 2005

The First President of the United States

There's not going to be a single original thought in this ditty; everything is George Grant's. So anyway, on to the first President of the United States. That's right: Peyton Randolph. Peyton Randolph was the first President of the United States. Henry Middleton was the second President of the United States. John Hancock, of large ligature legend, was the third. By now you should be screaming out in confusion that this was not what you were taught in school. Precisely! And therein lies the problem. You have been robbed. Of course, with schools the way they are these days, I shouldn't be surprised if you didn't even know that George Washington was the first President of the United States under our current
Constitution. Public schools these days have a lot to answer for. For my views on this matter, simply read Recovering the Lost Tools of Learning, by Douglas Wilson.

Anyway, I thought I'd give an anecdote about Peyton Randolph. John Adams said of him, "Peyton Randolph is remarkable because he can write two letters simultaneously in two different languages on two different subjects." John Adams, it must be confessed, could only write two letters simultaneously in two different langauges on the same subject. How about that?

Toodles.


 
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3 Comments:

At 9/05/2005 05:11:00 PM , Blogger Mr. Baggins said...

I like that: "of large ligature legend." Alliteration is a prime component in my opera libretto.

 
At 9/16/2005 11:35:00 PM , Blogger Lee said...

I like your post. However, to say that Payton Randolph and George Washington were both Presidents of the United States is to equivocate on the definition of President. Anyway, I like the blog.

 
At 9/19/2005 04:13:00 PM , Blogger Adrian C. Keister said...

Yes, Lee, you're right that it isn't exactly true that Peyton Randolph was the first President of the United States, or at least certainly not under our current constitution. My main point was to show two things: the poverty of the public school system, and the incredible learnedness of many men back in those days, compared with now.

 

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